At this time, there does seem to be a growing body of basic pharmacologic data suggesting there may be a role for CBD, especially in the treatment of refractory epilepsy. However, given the lack of well-controlled trials, we must also ask if we are getting ahead of ourselves. Clearly, this is an emotionally and politically charged issue. If this were any other uninvestigated pharmaceutical compound, would we feel as compelled to make the agent widely available before statistically valid class 1 evidence was available for review? Until data from well-designed clinical trials are available and reliable, and standardized CBD products that are produced using GMP are available, caution must be exercised in any consideration of using CBD for the treatment of epilepsy. In the meantime, based upon promising preliminary data, further clinical research should be wholeheartedly pursued. 

A survey of patients seen in a tertiary epilepsy center found that 21% of patients admitted to using marijuana in the last year, and 24% of patients believed marijuana to be effective for their seizures (10). While interesting, this anecdotal observation does not rise to the level of evidence needed to evaluate a potential new therapeutic modality.

The good news for all progressive-minded people is that cannabidiol and other phytocannabinoids are beginning to be taken seriously by both the medical and the political establishment. Though not many officials may recognize, the deficiencies in a healthcare system fit for the 21st century should be addressed by more than just inspired policies. Investment in further cannabinoid research and a departure from the status of cannabidiol as a shady Internet-sold dietary supplement is but the first step. A product that has the promise of delivering so many health benefits should not be further relegated to the recesses of unsanctioned, unscrupulous commerce.
Populum has enough confidence in what it sells to offer a 30-day trial of purchases, with the option to send products back within that period if they don’t live up to expectations. That offer speaks to the company’s customer-friendly ethos – and its willingness to answer any questions that people throw at it via email, phone or live chat does so, too. One customer is quoted on Populum’s website as saying that the company’s risk-free guarantee is “also a testament to [its] commitment to making a high-quality product.” Those wanting to see what the fuss is about can sample Populum’s hemp oil tincture – which comes in 250 mg, 500 mg and 1,000 mg concentrations – and cooling gel, safe in the knowledge that they are able to get their money back if need be.
You can thin the CBD with terpenes, encapsulate it in dextrin, drive the terpenes off with heat, and use the now water-soluble CBD in water with an ultrasonic fogger/oil-diffuser. It won’t precipitate, but the level of solubility is pretty low even with encapsulation, think 100mg per 200ml. The evaporation rate of those units is somewhere like 50ml/hour, which works out to .83mg of CBD being vaporized a minute, or .14mg every 10 seconds. That’s a miniscule rate. 
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